D&D: Discourse & Developments

Conditioning kids with ADHD to behave better

Besides dyslexia, Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (or ADHD) is the next most common learning difficulty among children and youths in Singapore, affecting nearly 5% of our students. On average, that's about 3 students in every class! How can specialist caregivers, parents and guardians help to make the child less impulsive and more compliant?

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One PROVEN way to help your child overcome dyslexia’s challenges

Is there a quick & easy solution to 'fix' dyslexia? The thing is, dyslexia is a spectrum of learning difficulties related to reading and writing; one of the biggest challenges that comes with it is the lack of fluency and accuracy with which the child reads. For younger learners with dyslexia, this is even more evident. However, I've some good news: this initial hurdle can be easily overcome!

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Dealing with dyslexia in Singapore

Happy 2018! Swords & Stationery has just relaunched, and we're going forward with greater things to come over the next few months. To jumpstart, our first post of the year will discuss a really hot issue that many parents of dyslexic youths in Singapore struggle with: how does one deal with dyslexia here?

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The Role of Role-Playing Games in Text Construction

When I first conceptualised the idea of using games as one of my teaching tools, it seemed very wild and out there. After all, how would one marry both synchronously, never mind the difficulty of convincing someone that it’s potentially far more effective than traditional rote learning?

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Ash, the misunderstood student (Part 3)

(Today’s post is a continuation of the ones from 23/10/2017 and 9/10/2017. You can read them first, in sequence, to get a better idea of Ash’s background and his development up until now.)

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Ash, the misunderstood student (Part 2)

(This post is a continuation of last fortnight’s post. While I will summarise the bulk of what was mentioned, I would recommend everyone who hasn’t read it already to do so, to have a better understanding of Ash’s background.)

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Ash, the misunderstood student (Part 1)

Swords & Stationery is reaching its 2-year anniversary soon. Looking back, I’ve had a lot of students with different needs. Some require(d) more attention; some need(ed) a harder, firmer approach. In the end, most had improved under my tutelage—academically, socially and emotionally. Naturally, many of them had also left a lasting but positive impression on me.

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Swords & Stationery: is it a tuition service?

What makes Swords & Stationery different—unique even—to other educational services out there? I figured this would be a good topic to address in this fortnight’s post.

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Gamebooks for dyslexics | Reading to help dyslexic children
Stationery

Reading gamebooks for leisure

I was born in the era of the Gameboy, Sega Genesis, SNES and Commodore 64 and IBM PC. When I turned 9, I’d completed or played to death most of the games that I owned, classic titles like Aladdin, Sonic, Pizza Tycoon, Heroes of Might and Magic and Wing Commander. For a time, I didn’t get many new computer games. My source of entertainment returned to books. And then, around the time when I started saving up money to buy new ones, I found this quaint genre called ‘gamebooks’.

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Disciplining youths with ADHD/ODD (Oppositional Defiant Disorder)
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Supporting children with special needs

Following my last post, it seems fitting to have one post for parents of youths with special needs, similar to the one on ADHD. A lot of times, parents who learn about their child being at risk of a specific learning difficulty will either be in denial or be sent into a panic; only a small fraction will calmly grab the proverbial bull by its horns.

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Stationery

An interview with Christina Tan, a parent of a dyslexic child living in Singapore

Recently, I came across a parent-support group (Dyslexia Support Group Singapore) for people with dyslexic children. The initiative is spearheaded by Christina Tan, a lawyer by training and mother of two, one of whom has dyslexia. I reached out to Christina for a chat and an interview—several areas were discussed, including the difficulties that her daughter (’E’) had faced and what she had done to help ‘E’ overcome them.

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