Discourse & Discussions

Tag: Role-Playing Games

Local Library
Swords

The Value of Literal Space

It can sometimes be difficult to get a place to play Dungeons & Dragons. DM Joss discusses the difficulties of finding good spaces to play in, and how she has come to appreciate places that do support such activities.

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Board games for learning
Stationery

How tabletop games help your child to learn better

There are many ways to make the learning process enjoyable, not least of which is the use of games to teach concepts. How can tabletop games like board games and role-playing games help your child to learn better? Read on to find out!

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Dice Vortex by Joss Hevel
Swords

Ladies Bonding Through D&D

I lived in Mississippi for about seven years before I found my circle of nerds – a group of 25ish-35ish males who play D&D. And that’s how it would have stayed, except it didn’t. The lie I told myself for years – that I just didn’t have female friends . . . that I just fit in better with guys – was about to be shattered.

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RPG dyslexia RPG ADHD dungeons and dragons writing
Stationery

What are role-playing games (RPGs)?

At Swords & Stationery, one activity that we use to help our students is the Role-Playing Game (RPG). It is an actual game that is played by millions around the world, although we’re the first and only organisation that uses it extensively for academic purposes (for instance, to write compositions and essays). What exactly is this game about, and how is it played?

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Stationery

The Role of Role-Playing Games in Text Construction

When I first conceptualised the idea of using games as one of my teaching tools, it seemed very wild and out there. After all, how would one marry both synchronously, never mind the difficulty of convincing someone that it’s potentially far more effective than traditional rote learning?

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Gamebooks for dyslexics | Reading to help dyslexic children
Stationery

Reading gamebooks for leisure

I was born in the era of the Gameboy, Sega Genesis, SNES and Commodore 64 and IBM PC. When I turned 9, I’d completed or played to death most of the games that I owned, classic titles like Aladdin, Sonic, Pizza Tycoon, Heroes of Might and Magic and Wing Commander. For a time, I didn’t get many new computer games. My source of entertainment returned to books. And then, around the time when I started saving up money to buy new ones, I found this quaint genre called ‘gamebooks’.

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Stationery

Learning from the post-apocalypse

I’ve been quite fascinated by the post-apocalyptic genre ever since I played the first Fallout game; subsequently I ventured into post-apocalyptic cinema, starting with Mad Max, then moving on to The Road Warrior. Despite the genre’s inherently violent, grim-dark and/or over-the-top overtones, there is a lot of underlying social commentary to be found if one

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Stationery

“Visual cards” as gaming and teaching aids

When playing tabletop RPGs, I use and re-use these handouts which I call “visual cards” to better illustrate the imagery of the scene. However, I’ve also found visual cards to be very helpful and, more importantly, cost-effective when teaching various concepts. Read on to find out more about them.

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Swords

Getting players to be personally invested in the game

About a year ago (has it really been that long?!), I brought up the empowerment effects that RPGs can have on learners and their self-esteems. One caveat: empowerment isn’t necessarily assured if there’s no personal investment in the game. Let’s look at what might go wrong, and how we can fix that.

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